The Articles of Ellen Gould Harmon White as printed in the Signs of the Times.
January 8, 1880 Christ’s Followers the Light of the World
Filed under: EG White Articles

(Continued from Vol. 5, No. 47.)

In the work of , when the of the first day broke, and the and , by the call of , came out of ; responsive to the rising light, “the sang together, and all the shouted for .” In the , gilding the of with its bright beams, saw the symbol of the light to be proclaimed in the earth by his , dispelling by its bright beams, , , and , and ushering in and , bringing back to those who have been to the . taught that all true and of , all and in the soul, must come through perfect and entire to his , which is the highest . The connected with their , which they were to put to a practical use, were given to the disciples upon this occasion. They were to carry the to the .

The , the “,” was imparting his beams of light to his disciples, and illuminating their minds, sweeping away their traditions and man-made requirements, and enforcing the real principles of God’s law upon them. He taught them lessons which they should put to a practical use in order to be the lights of the world. He taught them that they should exhibit in their character the graces of his Spirit which he pronounced blessed. The acceptance of the light he urged upon his hearers, as essential for their restoration to spiritual life. And for them to have a sound, healthful, happy experience, they must exercise the best and noblest faculties of the soul. He would have them understand that if they would make their lives pleasant, and useful to others, they must be obedient to the requirements of God. He always directs safely, and we shall not go astray while following where he leads. Said Christ, “I am the light of the world. He that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.”

Christ represents the disciples who have the attributes which characterize them as children of God, as the light of the world. Without these attributes they cannot be the light of the world, and they would not correctly represent Christ who is the Light of the world. As the sun goes forth in the heavens on its errand of mercy and love, and as the golden beams of day flood the canopy of the heavens and beautify forests and mountains, and awaken the world from their slumbers by dispelling the darkness of night, so should his followers go forth on their mission. They should gather the divine rays of light from the Light of the world, and let it shine forth in good works upon those who are in the darkness of error. Through the ministration of his ordained servants he carries forward his work through all time.

The message of light given to the assembled multitude on the mount was not alone for them, but was to be sounded in the ears of the church all along the line, through successive generations, resting with more solemn weight upon Christ’s ambassadors in the last days. Sinners are to be turned from the darkness of error to the light of truth, by the foolishness of preaching. He who accepts the light is to claim no authority himself; but as God’s messenger, with light reflected to him from the Source of light, he may claim the highest authority.

God might write the messages of truth upon the firmament of the heavens as easily as he placed the stars in their position. He might proclaim the truth and let it shine to the world through angel visitors, but this is not the way he ordained. He delegated power to his disciples to carry the light which he would communicate to them, to all parts of the world. Through his ambassadors God graciously infuses light to the understanding and warmth to the souls of those who acknowledge the message he sends, bearing light to those in darkness.

Paul writes to Timothy: “Be thou an example of the believers in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity.” “Take heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrine; continue in them, for in so doing thou shalt both save thyself and them that hear thee.” The ambassador must be obedient and faithful in the performance of his work as an instrument of God in the salvation of others. He cannot be saved himself if he is an unfaithful servant. He must be the light of the world. He must erect the standard of Christ in families, in villages, and cities, and in the hearts of men.

God does not select angels who have never fallen, but fallen man who has felt the redeeming power of the grace of Christ sanctifying his own life, and the bright beams of truth warming his own heart. As they have been in peril themselves, they are acquainted with the dangers and difficulties of others, and the way to reach others in like peril.

Said Paul, “We have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellency of the power may be of God and not of us.” This is the reason why angels were not chosen to preach the truth. The gospel was committed to weak and erring men that God might have all the glory. The supremacy of God is to be discerned in the frail instrument chosen to proclaim the message of truth.

Our Saviour often spent all night in prayer to his Father, coming forth with the rising sun to shed his beams of light upon the world. With his heart all full of sympathy for the poor, the ignorant and afflicted, he labored that he might elevate fallen man, and dispel the moral darkness by the light reflected from himself.
                                                            E. G. White.
                            (To be Continued.)

Jenny @ 7:11 pm
March 6, 1879 Necessity of Thorough Bible Study
Filed under: EG White Articles

[THE FOLLOWING WE FIND IN THE WEEKLY INSTRUCTOR, NO. 9. IT IS FOR THE SPECIAL CONSIDERATION OF THOSE INTERESTED IN THE SABBATH-SCHOOL WORK.]

We are fast entering the perils of the , when views which conflict with the will be presented by men of giant intellects, and we ought to be able to show the falsity of their claims. Our also should be thoroughly furnished with , so that they will not be moved by every new doctrine presented in their hearing.

Many do not see the necessity that their children should be so particular in learning their lessons, and often neglect to give them proper assistance or encouragement. The great object of thoroughness in the study of the is that they may understand why they as they do, and that when the test shall come and the question is asked, “Will you God, or will you yield to the requirements of ?” they will decide to serve God, because by studying his word they have learned to Him and His .

We desire that the youth shall be able to say, we have become familiar with the Scriptures, and we see that it is of the highest importance that we be obedient to the truth of God found in his word. We want the little children to understand the Bible, and grow up in the knowledge of the truth. And we as parents do not wish to be found among those who do not see the necessity of their children’s understanding the Scriptures for themselves, and who are therefore negligent and cause their children to be negligent; but we want to be in earnest in these matters, and search the Scriptures, and see that our children search them. Christ said, “Search the Scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life, and they are they which testify of me.” We should become firm in the truth, the word of God, which testifies of Him in whom all our hopes of everlasting life are centered. If you would know how to imitate the spotless life and character of Christ, obtain a knowledge of him as presented in the word of God.

The apostle says, “All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works.” If, therefore, you would be thus thoroughly furnished, and “ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you, with meekness and fear,” study the Bible with all diligence.

The teachers in our Sabbath-schools should be God-fearing men and women who can have an interest in the spiritual condition of the members of their classes, as well as see that they have good lessons. They should be connected with God, and should feel it a duty to pray with and for each pupil in their classes.

The Sabbath-school teacher who is faithful in little things is preparing himself for a higher responsibility. We should be faithful in everything. It is a sin to forget. Many are heard again and again to excuse themselves for some gross error, by saying that they forgot. Have they not intellectual powers? and is it not a duty to discipline their minds to be retentive? It is a sin to neglect. If you form a habit of negligence you will find at last you have neglected your own soul’s salvation, and are unready for the kingdom of God.

Parents and teachers, let us awake to our duty; let us sense the responsibility of our position, and take hold of the Sabbath-school work with more zeal and earnestness, that God can approve of our efforts, and that our children may lay up sound knowledge, and with us be prepared for the future immortal life.                                          E. G. White.

Jenny @ 9:24 am
September 12, 1878 New England Camp-Meeting
Filed under: EG White Articles

This has been a very important meeting. From the first we have had a large attendance from the outside, a good attentive congregation. Much labor was required. New churches had been raised up since our last camp-meeting. Precious souls had accepted the truth, and these all needed meat in due season. All needed to be carried forward to a deeper and more thorough knowledge of practical godliness. The Lord gave me freedom in bearing my testimony.

Sabbath, Brother Goodrich gave a discourse in the morning. In the afternoon I was lifted above my infirmities and had freedom in speaking to the people. An invitation was given for those to come forward who wanted to be Christians, and those who had backslidden from God. Between two and three hundred responded. Fervent and effectual prayers were offered. Those who came forward were then divided in companies occupying four tents. A minister was appointed to each tent to labor for those who had come forward and who needed help. These meetings were a success, precious victories were gained. The evening following the Sabbath, Brother Smith spoke from these words, “Great and marvelous are thy works,” &c.

Sunday morning the weather was cloudy with some rain, which prevented so large an attendance from the outside as might otherwise have been expected; but as the prospect brightened for a fair day, the numbers increased rapidly, each train bringing more or less, until in the afternoon the crowd on the ground showed quite a marked contrast to that assembled on any other day during the meeting.

Elder Smith spoke in the morning upon the subject of the sanctuary, showing that the disappointment in the time was not a failure after all. After singing, Brother Farnsworth presented the subject of the Sabbath in the New Testament, showing conclusively that there is no evidence therein for the observance of Sunday. At half past one, Elder Haskell preached. Subject: Who changed the Sabbath. At three o’clock I took the stand, speaking upon the subject of temperance. I spoke one hour, while the people listened with the deepest attention.

A gentleman from Boston, the guardian of a home for orphan children in that city, desired an opportunity of speaking a few words and taking up a contribution for the benefit of the home for the friendless, which is supported purely by charity. He brought with him four of the children, from eight to twelve years of age, who sung little songs very prettily. The remarks on this occasion were brief, but to the point, and all were interested in the home for the fatherless and motherless.

The meetings had been held with but little intermission from nine o’clock until nearly six. The people upon the ground were more quiet than usual upon such occasions.

Monday morning, meeting at the tent commenced at half-past five. I spoke about thirty minutes upon the necessity of economy in dress and in the expenditure of means. There is danger of becoming reckless and careless in the use of the Lord’s money. Young men who engage in tent labor should be careful not to indulge in unnecessary expense. The wants of the cause are many, as tents are entering new fields, and as the missionary work is enlarging. The most rigid economy should be used in this matter without stinginess. It is easier to run up a bill than to settle it. There are many things that would be convenient and enjoyable that are not needful, and that can be dispensed with without actual suffering. It is very easy to multiply expenses for hotel bills and railroad fare that might be avoided, or very much lessened. We have passed over the road to and from California twelve times, and have not expended one dollar for meals at the restaurants or in the attached dining car. We eat our meals from our lunch baskets. After being three days out, the food becomes quite stale, but a little milk or warm gruel supplies our lack.

Our morning meeting was held in the tent. I spoke again about thirty minutes in reference to genuine sanctification, which is nothing less than a daily dying to self, and daily conformity to the will of God. Paul’s sanctification was a constant conflict with self. Said he, “I die daily.” His will and his desires every day conflicted with duty and the will of God. Instead of following inclination, he did the will of God, however unpleasant and crucifying to his nature.

The reason many in this age of the world make no greater advancement in the divine life is because they interpret the will of God to be just what they will to do. They do exactly as they desire, and flatter themselves they are conforming to God’s will. They please themselves in everything, and therefore have no conflicts with self. Many are successful for a time in the conflict against selfish desires for pleasure and ease. They are sincere and earnest; but grow weary of protracted effort, of daily death, of ceaseless turmoil, and resisting Satan’s temptations. Indolence seems inviting, death to self, repulsive; and they close their drowsy eyes and fall under temptation instead of resisting it. The pride of life, fashionable sins, do not seem so very repulsive to them.

There is no compromise in the word of God for those who conform to the world. The Son of God was manifested that he might draw all men unto him. But he came not to lull the world to sleep - not to send peace, but a sword. The followers of Christ must walk in the light of his glorious example, and, at whatever sacrifice of ease or selfish indulgence, at whatever cost of labor or sufferings we must maintain the constant battle with self, exalt the gospel standard, and push forward the triumphs of the cross.

We called on those who desired to be baptized, and who were keeping the Sabbath for the first time, to come forward. Twenty-five responded. These bore excellent testimonies. One gentleman of intelligence said he had seen light upon the Sabbath commandment since these meetings commenced. He stated that he had kept the first day strictly according to the canons of Rome, but he now saw that he had not been keeping the day the Lord had sanctified and blessed. But from this time, as long as God spared his life, he should keep the seventh day specified in the fourth commandment. He also stated that the members of his church had attended these meetings, and were very much interested and stirred in regard to the things they had heard.

We had a good attendance from those residing in the vicinity where our camp-meeting was held. The spirit of the meeting is having a moulding influence upon the community. The spirit of the Lord has been in our midst. My testimony has been well received. I have been strengthened and blessed of God. While trying to water others, my own soul has been watered.

We were pleased to meet here our old friends of the cause whose acquaintance we made above thirty years ago. Our much respected Brother Hastings is as deeply interested in the truth today as he was then. We were pleased to meet Sister Temple, and Sister Collins of Dartsmouth, Mass., and Brother and Sister Wilkenson at whose house we had been entertained more than thirty years ago. The pilgrimage of some of these dear ones may close ere long, but if faithful unto the end they will receive a crown of life.

We were interested to meet Brother Kimbal who is a mute and has been a missionary among the mutes. Through his persevering labors, quite a little army have accepted the truth. We meet this faithful brother at our yearly camp-meetings surrounded by several of his mute converts. Some one who is interested, who has ears to hear, writes out some portion of the discourse, and he sits surrounded by his mute friends actively preaching to them with his hands. He has freely used his means to advance the missionary work, thus honoring God with his substance. By and by, if faithful, he will receive a precious reward. Twenty-two received baptism.

We hope that the influence of this meeting will continue, that conviction will deepen, and that all who profess the truth will strive for the unity of the faith, and that oneness which Christ prayed might exist among his disciples, and with all those who should believe on their word. An early meeting of Tuesday morning closed the camp-meeting at this place.
                                                                  E. G. W.

Jenny @ 9:51 pm
May 9, 1878 Sanctification through the Truth
Filed under: EG White Articles

We who profess to keep the commandments of God, are not beyond the temptations of Satan. The history of the Jews was written for our benefit, upon whom the ends of the world are come, that we should not murmur as they did; that we should not be filled with ambition and pride as they were; that we should avoid their example of wrong doing, and not fall as they fell. In the sacred word of God the history of Israel is spread out before us for our instruction. Are we making the most of the information given us, or are we merely following in the footsteps of the Pharisees, merely pretending to be connected with God, bearing the leaves of the profession, but not the fruit. We have the truth of God, the most precious, sacred truth that was ever given to the world; the truth that was likened to a golden chain, being let down, link after link, from heaven to earth for us to grasp. Yet, we may profess to grasp the golden links of truth, and still not be sanctified by it. Like the pretentious fig tree, we may be covered with leaves but be destitute of fruit. While we know that the truth we hold is as firm as the everlasting hills, how many of us are ready to settle down upon the theory of that truth, without having evidence that Christ is in them, and they in Christ? How many are content to pass on from day to day without experiencing its sanctifying influence upon the heart, which leads to good works. Christ said, “Sanctify them through thy truth; thy word is truth.” It is the sanctification through the truth that makes us the beloved of God.

We should not only take hold of the truth, but let it take hold of us; and thus have the truth in us and we in the truth. And if this is the case, our lives and characters will reveal the fact that the truth is accomplishing something for us; that it is sanctifying us, and is giving us a moral fitness for the society of heavenly angels in the kingdom of glory. The truth we hold is from heaven; and when that religion finds a lodgement in the heart, it commences its work of refining and purifying; for the religion of Jesus Christ never makes a man rough or rude; it never makes him careless, or hard-hearted; but the truth of heavenly origin, that which comes from God, elevates and sanctifies a man; it makes courteous, kind, affectionate, and pure; it takes away his hard heart, his selfishness and love of the world, and it purifies him from pride and ungodly ambition.
                                                                 E. G W.

Jenny @ 7:53 pm